queeringthrulife:

annicron:

look at this thing i got at the airport when leaving germany
it’s a giant tic tac box filled with tiny tic tac boxes


Want

queeringthrulife:

annicron:

look at this thing i got at the airport when leaving germany

it’s a giant tic tac box filled with tiny tic tac boxes

Want

The only problem with off the grid living is that corporations lose their ability to control others. With a completely self-sustaining life style, no body would ever have to work. What would happen then? Think about that for a moment. We would be free to expand and create, to discover our full potential as a race and move forward into the world of exploration and discovery, all the while living in harmony with nature, not against it.

-Arjun Walia

This is everything I ever dreamed of. There would still be “work” but it would be things we actually needed…like gardens and bee keeping and shepharding and knitting…and earthbag building, and cob building, and making sustainable energy generators. Ughggh, the feels.

(via amourlegirafe)

(via granolablossom)

hemptemples:

My great grandma has a bath tub in her pasture, making a little pool in a creek.. it’ll be filled with tadpoles soon…

hemptemples:

My great grandma has a bath tub in her pasture, making a little pool in a creek.. it’ll be filled with tadpoles soon…

(Source: kawaiibuttslut, via granolablossom)

mercurieux:

🌳🍓

mercurieux:

🌳🍓

(via granolablossom)

motherearthnewsmag:

65 Tips to Save Money for Self-Reliant Living
Apply a do-it-yourself approach to personal finance to significantly reduce your living expenses. Follow these tips to save money from our community of readers and experts to start living on less today. [Start saving!]

By Kale Roberts
Photo by Photoshot/Simon McBride/Red 

motherearthnewsmag:

65 Tips to Save Money for Self-Reliant Living

Apply a do-it-yourself approach to personal finance to significantly reduce your living expenses. Follow these tips to save money from our community of readers and experts to start living on less today. [Start saving!]

By Kale Roberts

Photo by Photoshot/Simon McBride/Red 

(via granolablossom)

toneyspeaksloud:

Nicki Minaj shining a light on the differences on acceptable sexuality from white women and black women.

While it has a good deal to do with color, it also has to do with the fact of how her sexuality is used.

The women above her could arguably be said to be catering to the sexual needs/wants/fantasies of men (Sports Illustrated is ESPECIALLY known for catering to a male gaze.)  While Nicki Minaj has continuously used her sexuality to empower herself.  Her sexuality isn’t for men, it’s for her own self.  And THAT is a huge problem.  Sexuality that isn’t designed for male consumption is deemed unacceptable and threatening.  She is powerful, demanding, uncompromising, and men are weak, so that scares them.

And it’s also because she’s of Indian/Black background, no doubt about it.  It’s not just racist, it’s also sexist.

(Source: , via mrsdevilla)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

(via savasanamama)

seebaby:

A lovely reminder:

Before we were conceived, we existed in part as an egg in our mother’s ovary. All the eggs a woman will ever carry form in her ovaries while she is a four-month-old fetus in the womb of her mother. This means our cellular life as an egg begins in the womb of our grandmother. Each of us spent five months in our grandmother’s womb and she in turn formed within the womb of her grandmother. We all share the blood of the first mother - we are truly children of one blood.
-Siobhan Sullivan 

seebaby:

A lovely reminder:

Before we were conceived, we existed in part as an egg in our mother’s ovary. All the eggs a woman will ever carry form in her ovaries while she is a four-month-old fetus in the womb of her mother. This means our cellular life as an egg begins in the womb of our grandmother. Each of us spent five months in our grandmother’s womb and she in turn formed within the womb of her grandmother. We all share the blood of the first mother - we are truly children of one blood.

-Siobhan Sullivan 

(via savasanamama)

mostlydogsmostly:

Lovely Vixen (via Dan Belton)

(via ashley-lynne-xvx)

Naturaekos:

☀️ 100% photography, following all similar back ☀️

bb-shine:

Cows smelling flowers

(via ashley-lynne-xvx)